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From NDCs to National Climate Investment Plans: domestic investment and climate finance tracking

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Transforming the NDCs into financeable investment plans requires an understanding of existing domestic and international flows – private or public – in all countries. Practitioners and country representatives discussed how this data and cross-country comparison can help reorient and scale up financial flows.

Program

Moderator: Ian Cochran, I4CE – Institute for Climate Economics

Speakers:

  • Jane Wilkinson, Climate Policy Initiative
  • Lauren McNicoll, OECD Research Collaborative
  • Sandra Guzman, GFLAC
  • Marek Soanes, International Institute for Environment and Development

Country Reps for Discussion:

  • David Kaluba, Zambian Climate Change Secretariat
  • Representative from the Indonesian government

Key takeaways : 

Tracking domestic climate finance is a key exercise to support NDCs as it allows:

  • Report – internally (government, parliament, general public) or externally (EU, UNEP)
  • Diagnose – effectiveness (climate, GHG), efficiency (leverage, money), gaps (vs. estimates)
  • Compare – with other countries, sectors, etc.
  • Recommend – propose how to close the gap
  • Coordinate & Plan – a helicopter view, basis for strategies for financing investment, connect capital and pipeline of projects
  • Modeling – represent financial channels and their impact the economy

All presenters stressed the importance of moving from NDCs to climate finance plans looking at both the investment costs, but also the methods and means of financing the needed investments. The following statements were made :

  • Volume should not be the key focus or indicator: it is essential to look at the efficiency of actions and their impact. This is required both in terms of mitigation and adaptation outcomes, as well as mobilizing additional public and private finance.
  • It is key to look at investments and flows going to national and subnational actors as both are in important positions to implement actions and establish key policies.
  • Engaging the private sector is necessary as it will play a significant role in scaling up from the billions to the trillions to achieve climate objectives and, as called for by Article 2.1c, align all financial flows.
  • Capacity building is needed – both in terms of accessing finance, as well as designing and developing national domestic climate finance plans.

Check out all the presentations of our panelists below.

You can also read the latest version of the French Landscape of Climate Finance : here

 

 







Contact


Ian COCHRAN, Phd

Program Director - Financial Institutions

Ian Cochran is Program Director – Financial Institutions. He coordinates the public-interest think tank’s work on investment, climate and decision-making support. Ian has worked in the area of climate and environmental policy for close to a decade, focusing his expertise on the mainstreaming of climate-change related issues into decision making and institutional governance. He currently supports his team’s work on a broad range of investment-related issues, including the role of public financial institutions in the low-carbon transition; the environmental integrity of financial products; climate risk perception by financial actors; international and national climate-related financial flows; and the alignment of development finance and long-term climate change objectives.

Ian holds a PhD in economics from Université Paris-Dauphine (France), a Master of Public Affairs (MPA) from Sciences-Po Paris (France) and a BA in Policy Studies from the Syracuse University Maxwell School of Public Affairs (USA). Before joining I4CE, Ian worked at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In 2015 served as a co-reporter on the French Presidential Commission on Innovative Climate Finance “Mission Canfin-Grandjean.” Ian lectures in master-level programs at Sciences-Po Paris and Université Paris-Dauphine.

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