Julie EVAIN
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Julie EVAIN

Project Manager - Finance

Julie joined I4CE in 2018 and works as Project Manager on financial regulation and climate change.
Her research interests focus on the integration of climate change issues into prudential regulation and supervision of banks and financial markets. As such, she is a member of the Climate and Sustainable Finance Commission of the French market supervisor (Autorité des Marchés Financiers). She also follows more broadly the issues related to green and sustainable finance as well as the analysis of climate risks for financial actors. Julie also teaches at the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées.

 

 

Graduate of a Master’s degree in International Affairs and Environmental Policy at Sciences Po, she previously worked at the French National Assembly, at a consulting firm and at the French Ministry of the Environment, where she was co-rapporteur of the report French strategy of green finance.

Team
Last contributions
  • 25/11/2022 Foreword of the week

    Financial regulators must stenghen their game

    One year ago the creation of the Glasgow Finance Alliance for Net Zero - GFANZ – was announced. The expectations were as big as the numbers: a coalition gathering 500 financial actors representing 130 trillion dollars. Private financial actors were finally stepping in and mobilizing. But one year later, the coalition raises many doubts. On one side it faces criticism from NGOs, and on the other some US actors are considering leaving the coalition under the pressure of members of Republicans Party.  
  • 24/11/2022 Climate Report

    Implementing prudential transition plans for banks: what are the expexted impacts?

    The European Union has made rapid progress on the issue of transition plans for companies and banks. First of all, the CSRD directive obliges each listed company to publish its plan for achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. Published by EFRAG this summer, the standards set for these plans can be considered ambitious and commensurate with the challenges they face. With regards to banks, it is now clear that they will be required to publish their transition plan. What remains under debate is whether these transition plans should be integrated into prudential regulations, which would open the way to numerous possibilities of action and sanctions by supervisors.
  • 26/04/2022 Climate Report

    Include mandatory banking transition plans within Pillar 2

    The transition plans aim to establish a progressive decarbonisation strategy by 2050, in line with the European Union’s objectives. The European Central Bank, through Frank Elderson, as well as several NGOs are calling for transition plans to be made mandatory for banks and to be integrated into prudential regulation. This note first looks at why […]
  • 14/02/2022 Blog post

    Finance: I4CE’s recommendations to the Basel Committee

    The Basel Committee is finally taking up climate issues! Founded in 1974, this forum which brings together the financial supervisors of the G20 countries and which provides the main guidelines for guaranteeing financial stability has been absent from climate issues since Donald Trump's mandate. It recently published a first consultative document on the principles of climate risk management and supervision. Julie Evain presents the recommendations addressed by I4CE to the Basel Committee.
  • 23/09/2021 Climate Report

    Indexing capital requirements on climate : What impacts can be expected ?

    As the main financier of the French and European economies, banks play a key role in financing the transition. Their current contribution in France is in the order of 8 billion euros per year, but this will need to more than double according to estimates by I4CE. To accelerate this shift for banking institutions and to prevent their increasing exposures to climate risks, the debate has tended to revolve around whether or not there is a need to reform prudential requirements.
  • 01/02/2021 Climate Report

    Can financial regulation accelerate the low-carbon transition?

    In recent years, financial regulators have encouraged financial actors to take account of “climate risks” in order to ensure both financial stability and the efficient functioning of markets, the two traditional objectives of regulation. This risk-based approach is an important first step, but will it be enough to deliver on climate objectives?
  • 01/02/2021 Climate Brief

    Can financial regulation accelerate the low-carbon transition? Summary for policymakers

    In recent years, financial regulators have encouraged financial actors to take account of “climate risks” in order to ensure both financial stability and the efficient functioning of markets, the two traditional objectives of regulation. This risk-based approach is an important first step, but will it be enough to deliver on climate objectives?
  • 10/07/2020 Blog post

    The European Commission’s next challenges for sustainable finance

    To accelerate and deepen this work, the new European Commission will adopt a renewed Sustainable Finance Strategy.  As the public consultation to define the future directions of this strategy draws to a close, Julie Evain from I4CE points out three challenges to be met in order to integrate climate issues into the financial sector.
  • 11/03/2020 Climate Report

    Integrating Climate-related Risks into Banks’ Capital Requirements

    Climate change dynamics are on a trajectory of intensification which may require the use of new and notable measures. The Paris Agreement recognized the urgency of directing financial flows toward low carbon activities and climate-resilient development. However, the latest special Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report 1 stated that to limit global warming to 1.5oC, the financial resources directed to green activities are by far insufficient and investments on carbon intensive projects are still far too high. At the same time, climate-related risks continue to potentially endanger the stability of the financial sector and they are only marginally addressed by Basel III capital requirements.
  • 28/05/2019 Climate Brief

    Is financial regulation in France in line with the Paris Agreement?

    The financial system has an important role to play in financing the transition of the economy and the drastic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and must take into account in its activities the risks that climate change poses to it. The French government has begun to mobilize on the subject, as have the Paris financial […]
  • 12/03/2019 Climate Brief

    Physical climate risk: Investor needs and information gaps

    Recent bankruptcy of Californian utility PG&E reckons that companies and their financial stakeholders are already exposed to the potential physical impacts of climate change, also called “physical climate risks”. While risk is at the heart of financial institutions decision-making, only a few of them disclose how their portfolios – with potential PG&Es – are exposed […]
  • 12/12/2018 Climate Report

    Getting started on Physical climate risk analysis in finance

    Financial institutions are already exposed to the potential physical impacts of climate change also called “physical climate risks” in finance. These require immediate attention from financial institutions, in order to understand how well prepared are the economic actors that they finance.   Yet financial institutions still lack tailored information to analyze their exposure to these […]
  • 21/11/2018 Climate Brief

    Article 173: Overview of climate-related financial dislosure after two years of implementation

    In 2015, article 173-VI of the French Energy Transition for Green Growth Act set a global precedent by requiring investors to be transparent on the climate impacts of their investments.   After two years of investor climate reporting, covering their activities in 2016 and 2017, what lessons can be drawn from article 173-VI? This is […]
  • 12/04/2018 Blog post

    Edito – I4CE welcomes the holding of the First International Climate Risk Conference for Supervisors

    Central bankers are mobilizing against climate risks, advocating for greater transparency, carbon stress tests and regulation of the financial system that integrates these risks.   On April 6, close to 200 employees of central banks and financial supervisors, at the initiative of the Dutch Central Bank (DNB), the Bank of England, the Banque de France […]

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